Horn sharks and electrosensitivity

Horn sharks and electrosensitivity

Why biologist call them white sharks.

Why biologist call them white sharks.

Sharks aren’t scary once you get to know them!

Sharks aren’t scary once you get to know them!

”Neither forget nor forgive”
I stumbled across this powerful piece of street when I visited the La Boca area of Buenos Aires, in Argentina. The mural tells the story of “los desaparecidos,” the estimated 30,000 political dissidents and other civilians who “disappeared” during the period of military dictatorship between 1976-83. During Argentina’s Dirty War and Operation Condor, many alleged political dissidents were abducted or illegally detained and kept in clandestine detention centres, where they were questioned, tortured and sometimes killed. Many of the bodies were said to have been disposed in the river in La Boca.

Written in the mural are just a handful of names of the “disappeared.” I googled a few and got quite emotional at the time. Looking at it now still tugs my heartstrings. 
I’ve never seen a mural this big that was so clear of tags and vandalism. It’s clear that the memory of the desaparecidos is still very close to the heart of every Argentinian.

As a child, my championsona heard the school-yard rumor that at the right time, and in the right conditions, the move “splash"  had a 0.001% chance of being the most powerful water move imaginable.While he hasn’t discovered the “secret" of splash, he has figured out how to turn the humble magikarp into a winner!

As a child, my championsona heard the school-yard rumor that at the right time, and in the right conditions, the move “splash"  had a 0.001% chance of being the most powerful water move imaginable.
While he hasn’t discovered the “secret" of splash, he has figured out how to turn the humble magikarp into a winner!

It’s been over a year since I visited Peru, yet I still often smile remembering the brilliant Incan stone-work in Cusco.
Photo taken and edited by St-Amant.

It’s been over a year since I visited Peru, yet I still often smile remembering the brilliant Incan stone-work in Cusco.

Photo taken and edited by St-Amant.

I met a lot of nicely dressed llamas in Peru.

I met a lot of nicely dressed llamas in Peru.

portphillipfossils:

It’s highly likely that this bone is the phalange (fingertip) of a whale, though it could belong to a large species of dolphin such as an orca.
If you look at the shape of it, it’s a lot like a huge fingertip; but we’re 
not entirely sure which “finger” yet.
Just like other mammals, cetaceans (whales, porpoises, dolphins) have 4 limbs, though their back “legs” have become vestigial. Vestigial means that through evolution a part of the body no longer serves a function. While cetacean ancestors once used their legs to travel on land, as their descendants changed over time and became more adept at swimming the back legs were used less and less and eventually it became a vestigial part of their body.
Finding bones like these is important, as it reminds us of whales’ ancient land dwelling ancestors, and how evolution transformed creatures into the animals we see today.
This fossil was found by Ben, in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia.

I just started a new blog with my friend Ben who hunts fossils. He examines and identifies fossils from his collections, and I make illustrations of the creatures that the bones came from.

The aim is to post once a fortnight, and that hopefully others might send in photos of fossils they’ve found for us to write about/illustrate.